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Subject:im new to all of this
Time:01:56 am
 hello!
I have a good number of friends that are UU's and they had always mentioned that i would love the cons and youth group etc. I never really considered going to church with them untill a few months ago, the word church alway rubbed me the wrong way i guess. I was raised lutheran/catholic/christian and i hated it. I hated everything they stood for and how opressive it was and well, soo much more, im not going to go on a rant now :P. but i finaly went to the christmas eve mass and i loved it. i loved what it stood for and how accepting the church was. 
This weekend i went to one of the cons and enjoyed meeting other people like this. 
I would like to start considering myself a UU but i dont feel right doing that untill i know alittle bit more about its history. like what does the challice stand for? are there any sacred texts or anything? and stuff like that. so if you could tell me some things you think i should know or send me to another resource, that would be great. 

thank you all!
<3 kashmir
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cheesybunny
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Time:2007-01-16 07:05 am (UTC)
You can find most of what you're asking for at uua.org.
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flameinthecup
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Time:2007-01-17 12:12 am (UTC)
+1
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of_chance
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Time:2007-01-16 08:37 am (UTC)
http://uua.org/YRUU/ is also pretty sweet.


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byrodude
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Time:2007-01-16 08:49 am (UTC)
sacred texts. nope. not really. Pretty straight forward. Also, here on the west coast, a lot of congregations feel really uncomfortable calling themselves churches because of the negative connotation that comes along with it. A lot of congregations use Fellowship, as the descriptive word. I'd say, as a life long member that this is the least crazy religious group in history. I was a Christian for quite some time as well. But I realized that all I had been taught was based on indeterminate fact, something that could not be proven. uua.org is a really good site. If you want a more youth centric site, with maybe some more challenging articles, go to www.fuuse.com i feel you will not be disappointed.
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street_light13
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Time:2007-01-16 08:24 pm (UTC)
yeah, there is the same thing here with using the word church, which i tottaly agree with because it, at first, even swayed my views or prejudgements on what it would be like.
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thats_the_catch
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Time:2007-01-16 02:07 pm (UTC)
I remember you from this weekend! (I'm Morgan, but I don't think we were ever actually introduced.)

As far as history goes, last year I wrote a paper for school comparing Unitarianism and Anglicanism (since my family is Anglican), so here is an exerpt from the history portion of the essay. Sorry it's a bit long, and sorry the writing isn't very good. Don't forget that there is only such a heavy Anglican emphasis because that was the topic of my paper.

     Evidence of Unitarianism has been traced back as far as 325 A.D., but for centuries, Unitarian theology was taboo in European society. It was not until the 16th century that the religion developed a large following in Eastern Europe, though the name “Unitarian” was only coined in Transylvania in the 17th century. Around the time of the English Reformation, Unitarians could be described simply as people who rejected the Doctrine of The Trinity; they believed that God was a single entity rather than one composed of three parts. Believers in The Trinity considered Unitarianism to be a rival religion. Michael Servetus, a Unitarian, published an article in 1531 entitled “On the Errors of The Trinity.” Servetus was burned at the stake not long after the publication. The first church that promoted Unitarian concepts was established in London in 1550 and it was called The Church of Strangers. For many years, Transylvania was populated with a large number of Unitarians; in 1566, even the king of the country, King Sigismund, was a Unitarian. King Sigismund tried to promote religious tolerance in the country, but in 1566, a man named Francis David spoke out against The Trinity and was sent to prison.
     Tension between devout Christians and Unitarians continued to develop during the 17th and 18th centuries. By the 1700s, Unitarians were still being persecuted by intolerant Catholics and Protestants; however, and increasing number of Anglicans were turning towards Unitarianism. The effects of the conversion of Anglicans were becoming noticeable. In an effort to keep its members, the Anglican Church presented a petition to the British Parliament requesting that it stop requiring members of the Church of England to subscribe to a creed. Unfortunately, the petition failed, which consequently caused more members to convert to Unitarianism. One of the most notable converts was an Anglican clergyman, Theophilus Lindsey, who established the first solely Unitarian church in England after renouncing the Church of England.
     During this era, when Unitarians were asked about their beliefs, they would claim “not only were they Christians… but they were the truest Christians” (Hewett 77). While this may have been a method for provoking the members of the Christian church, there were still Unitarians who claimed to be the truest Christians in the 20th century. In 1946, a prominent Unitarian minister in England, Randall Jones, said, “[Unitarians] assert that their kind of Christianity is Christianity in its simplest and most intelligible form” (Hewett 77).
     Anglicanism has had a large effect on the history and development of Unitarianism. John Locke and Sir Isaac Newton have both had profound impacts on the Unitarian movement, though they were both devout Anglicans. Some of these men’s theories, such as John Locke’s theory that every person is good by nature, are clearly reflected in Unitarian beliefs. According to author Phillip Hewett, Unitarianism only exists in its current state because of the Protestant church. Hewett wrote that Protestants “paved the way for Unitarians and other heretics, since what was proposed as a scheme of beliefs to be accepted at an intellectual level could also be rejected at an intellectual level” (Hewett 73). The fact that Protestants adopted a more abstract perspective about the stories in The Bible allowed Unitarians to develop their own theories and opinions.


I hope that was slightly helpful :]
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street_light13
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Time:2007-01-16 08:27 pm (UTC)
oh cool! yeah idk im bad with names anyway :P
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byrodude
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Time:2007-01-16 09:11 pm (UTC)
i'm going to have to say that the above article, however factual, actually makes it harder for one to understand Modern Day UUism, as most of the Christian elements have been purged from the majority of congregations. The UUism of 2007 is more closely related to the Humanist movements stemming from the Civil Rights Liberals of the 1950's-60's. The elimination of dogmatic scripture and a focus on self guided faith is really the most important and unique part of UUism today. I am an agnostic-taoist and I am very well represented in the UUA at large. I would say that currently, UU-agnostics and UU-atheists outnumber UU-Christians, UU-Buddhists and UU-Muslims, at least on the west coast.
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jjthejackson
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Time:2007-01-16 09:24 pm (UTC)
Don't forget Jew-nitarians
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trusting_fool
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Time:2007-01-16 03:41 pm (UTC)
Also helpful: the main UU community is called chalice_circle.
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flameinthecup
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Time:2007-01-17 12:13 am (UTC)
+1
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jjthejackson
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Time:2007-01-16 09:24 pm (UTC)
the Chalice was designed by a Holocaust survivor who was helped by Unitarian resistance fighters

as for its significance, that is up for interpretation (i think, dont hold me accountable). I take it for Pagan roots and just the symbolism of fire.

Unitarianism started as Christianity, but it has transcended into something a little more all-encompassing
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flameinthecup
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Time:2007-01-17 12:13 am (UTC)
Before we accepted it yet after the holocaust survivor made it, I believe it was long associated with liberal either religion or thought, there is again, an entire page on it on the uua.org website.
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jjthejackson
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Time:2007-01-17 01:15 am (UTC)
Oh, and by the way

welcome, and may you find whatever you are looking for.
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lovemanifests
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Time:2007-01-18 12:16 am (UTC)
its the flame which "lights our search for truth"
teehee
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lovemanifests
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Time:2007-01-18 12:16 am (UTC)
hey
i was raised UU, and considered myself pretty lucky. I didn't like being dragged to church on xmas and easter, the two days a year my mom would return to her catholic roots.
Funny enough, I think it's from my UU community that I've gained a real appreciation of spiritual (or selectively non spiritual) space. Maybe I just miss the 7th and 8th grade "god images" and "world religion" curriculums of Sunday School when we visited all sorts of churches and temples and other sacred spaces.
I've bridged into the young adult community and absolutely love it. I just also like seeing other forms of spirituality. I live in nyc so I'm pretty lucky to have accesss to tons of different kind of spiritualities and lack ofs. Like last fall I went and hung out at the Tibetan House for a day (there were two Tibetan Buddhism Monks there who had just finished constructing a Mandala)

I bring this up just sort of to include the thought that while hating church is something to bond over, I also think it' important to remember that just because someone likes church doesn't make them totally bogus. Sometimes I even think about going to an Easter or Xmas service at a church around here just for teh tradition of it.

Also, there's plenty of UUs who also identify as Christian (i think around 10%) as well as other traditionally considered organized faiths. Yeay for diverse spiritual beliefs!

So yeah, glad you loved the con and the community!
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[icon] im new to all of this - YRUU
View:Recent Entries.
View:Archive.
View:Friends.
View:Profile.
View:Website (YRUU at the UUA (the youth office) - which doesn't endorse this community, i should note :)).